The Golden Lyre of Ur

The Golden Lyre of Ur

35.00

A beautiful carving of the Golden Lyre of Ur, on a copper plate that would look great on your wall shelve or desk. Made by hand by Baghdad's famous copper-smiths in ancient Souk AL-Safafeer.

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A beautiful carving of the Golden Lyre of Ur, on a copper plate that would look great on your wall shelve or desk. Made by hand by Baghdad's famous copper-smiths in ancient Souk AL-Safafeer.

The copper plate is about 8" x 8" x1'  depicting the 4,500 year old, Golden Lyre of Ur.

The Lyres of Ur or Harps of Ur are considered to be the world's oldest surviving stringed instruments. In 1929, archaeologists led by Leonard Woolley discovered the instruments when excavating the Royal Cemetery of Ur between from 1922 and 1934. They discovered pieces of three lyres and one harp in Ur, located in what was Ancient Mesopotamia and is contemporary Iraq. They are over 4,500 years old from ancient Mesopotamia during the Early Dynastic III Period (2550–2450 BCE). The decorations on the lyres are fine examples of the court Art of Mesopotamia of the period.

Leonard Woolley, a British archaeologist, discovered the lyres amongst the bodies of ten women in the Royal cemetery at Ur. One body was even said to be laying against the lyre with her skeletal hand placed where the strings would have been. Upon this discovery, Woolley was quick to pour in a liquid plaster to recover the delicate form of the wooden frame. The wood of the lyres was decayed but since some were covered in nonperishable materials, like gold and silver, they were able to be recovered. Strictly speaking, three lyres and one harp were discovered, but all are often called lyres. The instrument remains were restored and distributed between the museums that took part in the digs.